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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE's Latest Posts
NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi Although no stranger to the perils of not being able to fit in an F1 car Michael, as you may recall from my aborted comeback with McLaren in 1995, which I ended even after attempting to race an expensive and thorough chassis amendment, I am unaware of any regulations pertaining to the length, width, or height of a drivers head. Rest assured that I will leave no stone either turned, or unturned, to ensure that the regulations are scrupulously applied, or not applied, to all drivers this weekend. I will consult not only the regulations as delineated by the FIA, being the governing body of the sport, but also, in the interests of fairness, or potential unfairness, the Geneva convention. That extra 0.5 seconds that I got from the crowd at the British GP as a revered driver will be converted into the energy of an eagle-eyed Isle-of-Man special constable on the F1 beat.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi I would like to express my profound sadness at the retirement of statistically the greatest driver of all time. Even though we shared the track only briefly, for over a season before my initial F1 retirement in 1992, and for a handful of races on the way to his maiden title in 1994, and for a further handful of races in 1995, the year of my second and final F1 retirement, I have the utmost respect for his current tally of 91 wins, 155 podiums, 68 poles, 77 fastest laps, and 1560 career points. I hasten to add that it is significant, if not telling, that after myself, and possibly Damon, Michael was one of those special drivers for whom my dear friend and fellow retiree, Murray Walker, showed a unique adulation for, particularly Michael's idiosyncratic but impressive command of english. If it is of any consolation to Michael I could offer you my expertise as a fellow multiple retiree, given I have experienced, repeatedly, the traumatic consequences of retirement in terms of personal, financial, professional, and psychological wellbeing.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@jackie As a driver who enjoyed considerable success at a relatively advanced age, winning back to back F1 and Indycar titles in my early 40s, I just want to take this opportunity to make a statement to congratulate Michael on his podium finish in the 2012 European Grand Prix, held at the Valencia Street Circuit, Spain. Michael has thus become the oldest driver on the podium since Jack Brabham in 1970, the outright oldest in F1 history being Luigi Fagioli in 1951. Even though Michael was older than myself when I set my pole lap in Adelaide in 1994 we are still behind the aforementioned Brabham, the late great Fangio, and Farina. More surprising still, even though I was 41 years and 97 days old when I won my last GP, at the aforementioned Adelaide 1994 race, I am only seventh in the all time list, headed by the aforementioned Fagioli, at 53 years 22 days, which means Michael would have to win on or after the 25th January 2022 to add that to his impressive list of F1 records.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@jpm A potentially valid point Juan, although if my memory serves me correctly, your schooling would have taken place in Colombia, which, granted, is part of America in the continental sense, but most certainly not a part of the United States of America that Rubens and Michael alluded to. It is an easy mistake to make, considering the varying nomenclature used world-wide when referring to the federal constitutional republic in question. Incidentally, it is interesting to note that despite our rather dissimilar upbringings, you and I have enjoyed some strikingly similar career highlights, most notably, in this context, our respective successes as rookies in the pinnacle American open-wheeled series of our respective eras, with your Indianapolis 500 win on the first attempt, my own triumphant debut at Surfers Paradise, but perhaps most importantly our victorious championship bids in our respective rookie seasons.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@Murray I would like to put it on record that given my long association with the BBC I will respect the choices of their F1 team, irrespective of where they place me on the list, owing to the debt I feel I owe the BBC for being instrumental during my multiple F1 careers in establishing me as a British hero, a lesson you would do well to learn Lewis. Murray and I always had a special relationship, which endured during all our interviews, whether Murray was quizzing me after a victory, or after a defeat, during times of joy, or times of stress, or whether we spoke during my racing career, or during my retirement, or during my return, or during my subsequent re-retirement, or during my re-return, and final retirement. And further I might add how proud I am that we are linked so iconically in the pantheon of spectacular, dramatic, heart-warming, heart-breaking, heart-stopping, vintage F1 footage.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@Williams Firstly I'd like to go on record as saying that I wish to congratulate my former employers on a wonderful achievement in winning again in F1 after such a long time. If you do get a chance to visit the Williams trophy room Eddie, whether willingly or under duress, you will be treated to a plethora of silverware, reflecting the team's rich success encompassing,and I should clarify, I believe this accurate as of the 2012 Spanish GP: 9 constructors titles, 7 drivers titles, 114 race victories, and 127 pole positions. As one of Williams' most successful drivers, I myself will be prominent among those trophies, whether it be from my first Williams career memorable for that heart-breaking puncture that cost me the title in Adelaide, to my second Williams career which included my record-breaking title season in 1992 and ended due to a failure to meet my financial demands for 1993, to the third and final chapter in my Williams career as a guest driver in 1994 culminating in the final win of my F1 career, and indeed my Williams career, as fate would have it, again in Adelaide.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi While flattered to be on this list I would like to put it on record if I may that it has been a long road for me to get to this position of affluence, a long road that has had many twists and turns, but as the saying goes it is the long road that has no turning. An interesting point to make here is that while Eddie may brag about earning millions for his property investments, I was placed in the unenviable position early in my career of actually having to remortgage my own family property to fund my driving career. Therefore when I translated my talent into sucess on and off the track I vowed never to be in such a position again, making sound investments to ensure I had enough for my retirement. This was somewhat complicated by my multiple retirements in my career, even prompting my pension broker to insitigate a "Mansell" clause to cover this scenario for his other clients.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi Although such a proclamation may create a short-lived whirlwind of speculation, and subsequently provide some much needed revenue for the struggling newspaper industry, mainly due to strong competition from online media and a hunger for up-to-date information, and possibly in turn a shorter attention span becoming more and more evident in much of todays youth, such a comeback is most likely beyond the realms of reasonable probability. The oldest driver to partake in a Grand Prix was Louis Chiron, who, in 1955, raced in Monaco at the age of 55 years, 9 months and 19 days, which is a not insignificant 2 years, 11 months and 6 days younger than my present age, although it should be noted that Chiron did in fact attempt, albeit in vain, to qualify for the same race in 1958, at which point he would in fact have been almost a month my senior.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@Bernie Firstly, I would like to congratulate Eddie on joining the elite few motorsport figures who have been honoured with an OBE, which I was awarded myself, albeit that I have now surpassed that achievement having been awarded a CBE, or to give the full title in conjunction with my full name it would mean that I am Nigel Ernest James Mansell, Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire. This recognition from Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II means a great deal to me as a driver, who in addition to being renowned for his bravery on the track, was also lauded as a patriotic British driver, and I am no less proud to say that I was victorious in the British GP on four occasions. I used to like to say that it was the support of the public that gave me a few critical tenths of lap in time in my home GPs, just as they gave me their votes to crown me BBC Sports Personality of the Year twice, one of only three athletes to achieve this.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
While I am in principle in favour of inter-era driver comparisons, it should be noted that in this instance there are a number of discrepancies that should be taken into consideration before coming to an ultimate conclusion, much like similarly flawed comparisons to my pole position record of 1992 which, in my opinion, casually disregard the driving style required to take advantage of a hydropneumatic active suspension system among other technoligical innovations of the time, not to mention the quality of the opposing teams or indeed the credentials of the subject's team-mate, who in my case was the Italian-born Riccardo Patrese, an accomplished and vastly experienced driver who admittedly, in colloquial terms, stuck it to me in terms of qualifying results at the beginning of the 1991 season, only to be comprehensively usurped for the remainder of our relatively brief period as colleagues. In the case in question, one finds that this comparison is in fact humourously ironic in that Sebastian Vettel holds the record as the youngest F1 champion, whereas Juan Manuel Fangio holds the opposing, although not necessarily diametrically opposing, record of the oldest F1 drivers champion to date at, by today's standards, a rather mature 46.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi I'd just like to point out to all my fans that nothing is set in stone, nothing has been signed, and I can't comment on speculation until the necessary negotiations, if indeed there are any negotiations, regarding a role at Sky, if indeed there is a role at Sky, have taken place. Therefore I would ask everybody to contain their excitement at any possibility that I may, or indeed may not be, joining the F1 broadcast team of Sky Sports, a branch of British Sky Broadcasting. I cannot issue either a confirmation or a denial, although I also cannot comment that there is anything to either confirm or deny.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@Murray Thank you Murray, it is always great to hear from you. Perhaps if at some point in the future I get a role covering F1 for a major broadcaster, although I must be clear in saying that such an event is neither likely nor unlikely, it may give us an opportunity to have the occasional repartee we were renowned for in some of the now classic, and oft repeated interviews you did with me post-race. Given you are in retirement, which incidentally I am no stranger to myself, these occasions, if they are to happen, would be all the more special.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@MBrundle Although it may seem a bright idea to race with your son at Le Mans Martin, my own torrid experience taught me differently. Although hopes were high with myself, Leo, and Greg, sharing driving duties in a Ginetta-Zytek, at one of the most challenging and iconic circuits in the world, months of preparation came to naught. On lap 5, a sudden and devastating deflation of a tyre pitched me into the barrier with no hope of recovery, and although TV pictures did not do it justice, the impact resulted in a nasty race-ending concussion.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
Given Rubens may be forced into retirement, this has led me to reflect that I was no stranger to retirement myself in my Formula One career. I first decided to retire after a disappointing British GP in front of my adoring home fans, when it later transpired that my mechanics had acted in poor faith and without my knowledge to swap my chassis with that of my teammate Alain Prost. Having been persuaded out of retirement by an offer to drive for veteran team owner Frank Williams, I enjoyed a second wind in my career, culminating in a glorious 1992 season, with a record 9 wins in one season, subsequently surpassed by Michael Schumacher, as well as 14 poles, which is still a record. I then retired a second time when it transpired that Williams had acted in poor faith and without my knowledge to sign Alain Prost for 1993, only to be lured by the thrill of Indycar racng, becoming the only driver to concurrently be F1 and Indycar champion. I then retired from Indycar, returning to F1 for a final win for Williams in the 1994 Australian GP, before an ill-fated stint with McLaren, which led me to retire for the third, and as it transpired, final time.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@fernando I can't help but detect an element of sarcasm in that remark Fernando, but I think it is important to take into account Pastor's national history in Formula 1 when judging him against those who have gone before. Amazingly Pastor is only the third Venezuelan to race in the sport, and the first since 1984, incidentally my own last year with the Lotus team, which was largely blighted by the team principal Peter Warr's blatant dislike of myself, before I moved to Williams and broke a duck of my own with my first win. That driver was Johnny Cecotto, Toleman team-mate with Ayrton Senna, but whose career ended tragically with two broken legs received while qualifying for the British Grand Prix. Coincidentally, Johnny's rather modest career points total has now been equalled by Pastor with that very maiden point we have been discussing.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi While it may be considered of worth to perform as much safety testing as imaginable on an 800 horsepower racing car, I must take issue with your assertion Michael that the elk test, sometimes but not always known as the moose test due to a rather confusing nomenclature dissimilarity between Europe and North America, would have any significant safety implications for a Formula 1 chassis design. Perhaps your own personal anxiety regarding this vehicular examination stems from your current position as lead driver for the Mercedes Petronas GP Team, as the rather infamous failure of the road-going Mercedes Benz A-class automobile in a 1997 elk test may be preying on your mind, consciously or subconsciously. Of course if one were to introduce such safety measures, the relevant test would most likely not require the presence of any member of the deer family, as a well placed traffic cone can serve the same purpose with lower logistical requirements and greater predictability and repeatability.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi While I agree that Lewis' indiscretions of late have been rather unbecoming of a former world champion, and thus a de facto ambassador for our sport, I must vehemently protest your insinuation that any personal gripe between myself and a member of the driving community should have any effect at all on my deliberations and judgements for the coming weekend. I am truly honoured to have been asked to function as a steward for the grand prix at Silverstone, a place dear to my heart ever since my fastest lap as a mere test driver impressed Colin Chapman enough to give me a racing seat at the 1980 Austrian grand prix, a wonderful inaugral moment for a career which was to span well over a decade and present me, my family, friends and supporters with many highs and lows, successes and disappointments, and a debut which in hindsight was only slightly blighted by the second degree buttock burns I endured due to a pre-race fuel leak in my Lotus 81's cockpit.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
In all your youthful banter, I think what has been forgotten here is to look to history to provide the answers. From Mike Hawthorns last gasp clinch of the 1958 championship with a wonderful 2nd pace finish in Morocco, which incidentally would have in any event gone to another Briton, Stirling Moss, had Hawthorn failed to accomplish the required placing in the final race, to my own rather more dominant sweep with the Williams team in 1992, consisting of 14 pole positions, those being in all but two grands prix, 8 fastest laps and 9 race victories, through to Jenson Button's rather petering success in 2009 with the British Brawn team, a total of 10 British drivers have shared 14 championships in the 60 year history of the sport. Incidentally, it should be noted that in my own victorious season, every race was won by a British team, despite the appearance of a plethora of driver nationalities on the various podiums and an engine manufacturer complement ranging all the way from Japan to France. Thus it must be said that there is more than an element of truth to David's assertion regarding Britain's standing in motorsport circles, at the very least in historical terms.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi Those are very interesting assertions but seem to simplify the situation significantly, especially in terms of the thought processes undergone in coming to the conclusions cited in the article. Firstly, it should be noted that the interview, held over a brisk morning tea consisting of three different tyes of breakfast muffins, one of which had a distinct toffee aroma reminding me of a specific incident in my childhood where I was deprived of Sunday treats due to a minor indiscretion at a family event, was one in which subject matters were generally raised by the interviewer, a young and rather sprightly gentleman whose enthusiasm and engagement are sure to aid a quick rise up the journalism ranks, rather than the interviewee. Thus the matter of Sebastian Vettel's credentials was put forth by the aforementioned reporter, and was simply responded to and elaborated upon by my own furthering of the conversation in that direction. As such, any suggestion that my observations on Mr. Vettel's prospects should be seen in any way as revelatory is misguided at best, and misleading at worst.
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NigelErnestJamesMansellOBE   Nigel Mansell
@mschumi While you may be saying that in jest Michael, I feel it is important to point out that NASCAR tracks are not perfectly circular in shape. In fact, contrary to the commonly used nomenclature, they are also usually not oval shaped and actually tend to consist of two or more straight sections, incidentally known in the US as "straightaways", a word that on this side of the Atlantic, and even in certain southern hemisphere states, generally means immediately or with haste. Perhaps it is the usage of the word "oval" that has helped NASCAR and other US-based motorsport series to garner a reputation for simplistic and aggression fueled racing with no regard for the finesse and racecraft you and I know those drivers must most certainly possess.
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